How to boost your traffic with “Related Posts”

Jetpack: WordPress Security, Performance, and Growth

Jetpack’s Related Posts feature scans all of the posts on your site (or blog), analyzes them, and shows your visitors other posts with related content that they might be interested in reading once they’re done reading the one that brought them to your site.

Most sites who activate this see an increase in traffic. On this site, Jetpack.me, when we compare pages with and without the feature enabled we see around 79% more visitors clicking through to one other post on the site.

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This data is based on a 6-month traffic comparison between blog posts showing related posts and pages with the feature disabled. Turning on the feature for us in essence means that almost twice as many visitors read something else besides the original post that brought them here.

How does it work?

The related content is automatically generated based on the content of the post and any tags…

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21 (More) Things to A/B Test

Optimizely published a list of 71 Things to A/B Test on their blog. It's a pretty cool list. Here's my additional 21 things you could consider testing if you're hunting for inspiration:Wizards. For setup processes, checkouts or other long-ish flows, test a wizard-style UX vs one long 'settings' page.Surveys. If you're running customer surveys A/B test different …

Interview: How Paul Jarvis works with Jetpack

Jetpack: WordPress Security, Performance, and Growth

We got in touch with one of our users Paul Jarvis to find out what he thinks of the Jetpack plugin – how it has helped him and what he’d like to see in a new version. Paul is a freelance web designer/developer as well as an author of various popular books who’s been using WordPress since before he was born.

Paul lives in British Columbia, Canada. You can stalk him on Twitter @pjrvs or read about his books and work on his website.

Who is Paul?

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What do you do for a living?

I’m a freelance web designer/developer and author. I’ve built websites for 20 years and written books for the last 4.

What’s the best thing about your job?

I can set my own hours and stop working when I’ve made enough for the year (typically 3-4 months off per year).

How did you first start using…

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Top 5 Best Practices when using Jetpack on client websites

Jetpack: WordPress Security, Performance, and Growth

If you’re creating WordPress websites for clients, Jetpack is for you. Jetpack easily adds a great number of features to your client’s websites without the need for a dozen different plugins, reducing the technical debt that you or your client will need to maintain over time.

We recommend these best practices when using Jetpack for a client site that will keep things running smoothly and help you provide a great service to your clients.

This article covers:

  1. Use Jetpack’s Development Mode
  2. Invite your client to connect to WordPress.com
  3. Activate Jetpack only on the live domain
  4. Use your account when a connection is required
  5. Work with staging sites
  6. How to install Jetpack

1. Use Development Mode

Jetpack offers a Development Mode that is enabled when using Jetpack on a localhost. If you’re developing on a development server, you can manually enable development mode.

You can enable this as constant in…

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